Brush Buck

Brush Buck

I spent the morning out looking for whitetail deer since all of the ducks seem to have disappeared. I saw four different whitetail bucks, this was one of my favorite photos from the morning. I have already posted several others on my new page Take Sharp Photos, please feel free to check them out as well! ISO 160 – f/2.8 – 1/400s – 300mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens Photographed in Bloomington, Minnesota on 11-28-2014 at 12:00...
Winter Whitetail

Winter Whitetail

The large whitetail buck standing in his meadow, occasionally glancing in my direction to be sure I am not a threat. Shortly after this photo, he laid down to rest. I shared a photo of him resting yesterday. It has been my experience that it is much easier to accidentally get close to a deer than to walk up close to one on purpose. When I see a deer that I would like to approach and photograph, I try to walk very slowly, keep my head down because I try not to stare at them and I don’t walk directly towards them. ISO 200 – f/4.0 – 1/500s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 5D MkII Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens with Canon 1.4x Teleconverter MkII. Photographed in Bloomington, Minnesota on 11-26-2014 at 1:00...
Intimidating Buck

Intimidating Buck

The large whitetail buck gave me this very intimidating pose, right before he decided to lay down for a nap. I was slightly lower than the deer because I was down a hill from him and I was crouched down to get an even lower angle. ISO 400 – f/4.0 – 1/500s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 5D MkII Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens with Canon 1.4x Teleconverter MkII. Photographed in Bloomington, Minnesota on 11-26-2014 at 1:00...
Gliding

Gliding

A hen mallard, gliding in to the frozen pond, about to land with the rest of the ducks. ISO 800 – f/2.8 – 1/2000s – 300mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens. Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-25-2014 at 3:00...
Dancing Duck

Dancing Duck

Once again, an unusual duck pose. I am not really sure what this duck was doing with his head and feet turned to the side. It looks like he was doing some sort of dance. You will notice that the slow shutter speed caused a good deal of motion blur in the wings. The wide aperture also caused a very shallow depth of field, only the head of the duck is sharply in focus, but this image still catches my eye every time I see it. ISO 800 – f/2.8 – 1/640s – 300mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens. Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-25-2014 at 3:00...
Nine and One Half Point Buck

Nine and One Half Point Buck

A closeup portrait of a large Whitetail Buck. Even through it was an overcast day I used an aperture setting of f/4.0, one full stop down from wide open. The added depth of field helped to bring more of the head and antlers into focus at such a close distance. ISO 800 – f/4.0 – 1/400s – 300mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens Photographed in Bloomington, Minnesota on 11-22-2014 at 12:30...
Dripping Drake

Dripping Drake

You can see drops of water dripping off of this Drake Mallard, shortly after takeoff. The beautiful blurred background was created because the duck was relatively close to me and the background much farther away. Because the duck filled much of the frame of the camera I did not have to crop much of this photo. A bit more depth of field may have helped with sharpness, but since the photo is mostly viewed on the web, and has to be scaled down to save space, you can not easily notice much lack of detail due to narrow depth of field. ISO 400 – f/4.0 – 1/3200s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens with Canon 1.4x Teleconverter MkII. Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-16-2014 at 3:00...
Flying Drake Mallard

Flying Drake Mallard

Another photo of a drake mallard flying right in front of me. You can see the curly tail feathers which are a sign of an older bird. ISO 400 – f/4.0 – 1/6400s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens with Canon 1.4x Mk II Teleconverter Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-16-2014 at 3:00...
Mallard with Cold Feet

Mallard with Cold Feet

I have often seen photos like this and simply assumed that the feet had been edited out for some reason. That is not the case, this mallard has his feet tucked into his feathers to keep them warm. If you look closely you can see a wrinkle in his feathers where he has hidden his foot. This is an example of a photo where I could have probably used a lower ISO and/or smaller aperture to slightly improve the photo. If you examine the exposure information which I have included you will notice that this photo was taken with an un-necessarily fast shutter speed of 1/8000s. I could have used ISO 400 and the shutter speed would have been 1/4000s and still fast enough. I could have also adjusted the aperture one full stop down to f/5.6 and still had a shutter speed of 1/2000 which would have been more than adequate to freeze the motion. ISO 800 – f/4.0 – 1/8000s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens and 1.4x Canon Teleconverter MkII Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-16-2014 at 2:30...
Double Curl Drake

Double Curl Drake

A Drake Mallard in flight. You can see two curly tail feathers which is a sign of an older and more mature bird. ISO 400 – f/4.0 – 1/5000s – 420mm – Handheld – Natural Light Canon EOS 7D Body and Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens with Canon 1.4x Mk II Teleconverter Photographed in Eagan, Minnesota on 11-16-2014 at 3:00...